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Derrick's Not Quite Birthday - RonO's Ramblings

Sep. 5th, 2009 06:04 pm Derrick's Not Quite Birthday

Thursday was Derrick's 13th (YOUCH!) birthday. With school, work and other things we mostly did the fun birthday stuff today.

His choice for lunch was to go to the Ruby's Diner at the end of the Oceanside pier (not a choice either robot_grrl or I objected to too much). So after getting a bit of a later start than I might have wanted, we headed to the parking lot for the train station (cheaper than the lots a bit closer, shaded and less likely to be full on a hot holiday weekend Saturday) and walked to the pier, and then to the end.

Somewhat surprising since it was still the noon hour, we were able to get seated quickly. Tara and Derrick had a good view, but it was over my back so I mostly could talk to them and people watch.

Ruby's is a chain, but the Oceanside Pier location (and their original on one of the Orange County Piers) are a bit special because of their location. And the food is good, even if a modern and fancy take on diner food. I had a turkey burger with guacamole on it, Tara had their "kobe" sliders and Derrick cheated and had a kids burger.

After lunch, we walked back down the pier, past the crowds that were now waiting outside of Ruby's for seats. Then we walked a couple of blocks up Pierview Way to the California Surf Museum. The Museum has, in addition to its standing exhibit on the history of surfing in California -- largely a collection of surf boards used over the last 100 years -- a limited (I believe) exhibition on skateboarding, which logically emphasizes its historic connection to surfing.

I was interested to notice how much lighter the boards got when they went from being made of things like redwood, to balsa reinforced by fiberglass and then to composites over foam cores. I was also able to quite readily spot exactly where in history the long board was replaced by the now popular short board.

Derrick was more interested in the skateboards. I did have to make him read, and then still had to explain, both the connection between surfing and skating, and at the same time why so many of the early skateboard pictures had people barefoot.

I also was impressed with the display that showed the number of fairly early (i.e. still flat) skateboards that were made by the same companies and individuals, or at least endorsed by the same celebrities in at least one case, as the surfboards -- by providing examples of the pairings.

Tara was able to find a couple of skateboards in that display that are the same shape she recalls her uncle having (and her getting a very bad splinter from just before it was disposed of).

The museum gift shop had some interesting things. I was not one bit surprised to find several copies of The Endless Summer on DVD -- especially since it was highlighted in one of the banners with historical information. I was more amused at the coffee table book subtitled something like "An Illustrated History of Skateboarding Footwear" that features a picture of bare feat on a skateboard, with one toe wrapped, as the cover shot.

Tara got Derrick a book on basic skateboard tricks that he should try to try, and Derrick got a bunch of free stickers from the museum staff.

After that we went home where I found myself at loose ends when the palm pilot I've been using as an e-book reader the last few days, had a battery failure that nearly took the book (or at least the SD card with the book) with it. (One of these days I'll probably have to get myself a Kindle or possibly another e-book reader)

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From:brotherguy
Date:September 6th, 2009 05:22 pm (UTC)
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In my rapidly fading memory, skateboards arrived in Michigan the same summer as the Dave Clark Five. Would that be 1964 or 1965? Wikipedia doesn't help; I want to say '64 but somehow their song "Anyway You Want It" is what keeps going through my mind, and that was fall of 1964... maybe it was the fall, not the summer?

We had old flat wooden boards with roller-skate style metal wheels, and literally wore them out in a few days. Our favorite path was down a boat-launching ramp into Lake Huron; filling the ball bearings with lake water and sand probably didn't do them a whole lot of good!